Research initiatives in chronological order.

Robotics & Bionics Commons

Founded in 2020

Robotics Commons and Bionics Commons are two online repositories focusing on open-source software and open hardware robotics and bionics projects. Dr. Liarokapis founded Robotics Commons and Bionics Commons during his research and study leave (sabbatical) in 2020. Currently, these two repositories host all the open-source robotics and bionics projects of the New Dexterity research group. More details can be found at the following URLs:
www.roboticscommons.org
www.bionicscommons.org

Robotics NZ

Founded in 2020

Robotics.ac.nz is an initiative dedicated to the community of New Zealand / Aotearoa researchers, academics, technologists, enthusiasts, and industry representatives that work in the field of Robotics and Automation. More details can be found at the following URLs:
www.robotics.ac.nz

OpenRobotHardware

Founded in 2014

OpenRobotHardware is intended to serve as a resource for efforts focusing on open and open-source mechanical and electrical hardware, with a particular focus on projects that may be useful in robotics applications, robotics research and education.

Prof. Aaron Dollar (Yale University) is the Founder / Coordinator of OpenRobotHardware, while Dr. Liarokapis is the Co-Founder / Technical Coordinator. More details can be found at the following URL: www.openrobothardware.org

OpenBionics

Founded in 2013

OpenBionics is an open-source initiative that focuses on the development of affordable, light-weight, modular robot hands and prosthetic devices, that can be easily reproduced using rapid prototyping techniques and off-the-shelf materials. Dr. Liarokapis is the founder of the OpenBionics initiative.

The OpenBionics prosthetic hand design won the 2015 Robotdalen International Innovation award and the 2nd Prize (out of 900 projects) of the 2015 Hackaday Prize. More information can be found at OpenBionics website: www.openbionics.org

HandCorpus

Founded in 2013

The HandCorpus is a new repository where everyone can freely share and search for different kinds of experimental data about human and robotic hands. The repository is currently supported by 7 European Research Council/European Commission funded projects, and has a growing community that consists of 22 international research groups from 18 universities and 4 research institutes, across the world.

HandCorpus was created in collaboration with Matteo Bianchi and is available at: www.handcorpus.org